Davy Jones
Davy Jones

Davy was always interested in new ideas and started many businesses, from clothing & art stores to a record label and music publishing company. Throughout his life, Jones gave generously to many charities, and worked especially hard to raise funds and awareness for MS. With a career that spanned five decades, Davy Jones will always have a secure place in pop culture history as well as in the hearts of his ever-growing global fan base!

Early life
Born December 30, 1945 in Openshaw, Manchester, England as the youngest of four and only son of Harry & Doris Jones, David grew up a happy, energetic child. He showed promise in athletics, acting and music. In late 1959, his Aunt Jessie became his first agent when she answered an ad in the Manchester Evening News calling for “school boys to audition for a radio play”. David got the lead role in There is a Happy Land, at the time the longest part ever written for a teenager in a B.B.C. play. From there, David was cast in TV roles on June Evening, Z-Cars and as Colin Lomax, the grandson of Ena Sharples on the iconic British soap opera, Coronation Street. During this time, Doris Jones passed away after many years of suffering from emphysema. This prompted David to change plans and pursue a career as a jockey instead of acting. His father was put in touch with Newmarket-based trainer Basil Foster after contacting a local paper in Manchester regarding his son. After a six week trial during the summer of 1960, David quit school and moved to Newmarket at the end of the year to begin his apprenticeship with Basil Foster at Holland House. It was during his time as an apprentice jockey that David’s career and life would change forever.

1960s
A talent agent who owned horses trained by Basil Foster took a liking to the charming young stable boy and, learning of his past experience on television & radio, had David come to London to audition for a part in Lionel Bart’s new musical production of Oliver! His Mancunian accent was the only problem, and was encouraged to try again for the part. David perfected his cockney dialect while appearing as Little Michael in a stage production of Peter Pan that starred Jane Asher as Wendy. When the play ended, he returned to London and secured the role of The Artful Dodger. After a successful run in the West End, Oliver! was Broadway bound, including 16 year-old David Jones! Starring alongside veteran actors, Georgia Brown and Clive Revill, David stole the show night after night and eventually earned a Tony nomination. David, along with his cast mates, appeared on The Ed Sulllivan Show on February 9, 1964, the same night The Beatles were introduced to American audiences. Being young, talented, charismatic, good looking & British made David an even bigger prospect once Beatlemania broke out. When David’s run with Oliver! came to an end in 1965, he was asked by David Merrick to join the cast of his production of Pickwick, alongside the venerable Harry Secombe. It was a temporary role, but played in Los Angeles and San Francisco which was exactly where Jones wanted to be. Once in Hollywood, he signed a contract with Ward Sylvester of Screen Gems (then the TV division of Columbia Pictures), which also included a recording contract on their label, Colpix. 1965 was a year of searching for the right vehicle for Jones. He had guest appearances in Ben Casey, The Farmer’s Daughter, and finally The Monkees project emerged. He had already released a solo album, entitled David Jones, with a single that entered the Hot 100 during the summer of that year. After meeting with Monkees’ producers Bob Rafelson and Bert Schneider, David was selected as the first choice for their ground-breaking television show about a struggling rock band. Micky Dolenz, Michael Nesmith and Peter Tork were chosen to work well around Jones. They wanted four strong, unique characters to stand on their own, similar to The Beatles. David was introduced on The Monkees as Davy Jones, and it is that name that he is most identified with as an entertainer. The show debuted on September 12, 1966, ran two seasons, was nominated for three Emmy’s and won two. The Monkees and Davy Jones quickly became household names. As a recording act, they outsold The Beatles and The Rolling Stones combined in 1967. Due to the success of their television show and record sales, the four members established themselves as a working band in order to tour. From 1966 to 1971, they toured the world, had three #1 singles (including Davy’s signature lead vocal performance on “Daydream Believer”), four #1 albums, a TV special & cutting-edge motion picture, Head, that has since become a cult classic. David, on his own and with the band, appeared on television shows such as Top of The Pops, The Hollywood Squares, The Glen Campbell Goodtime Hour & The Johnny Cash Show. The end of the group meant a whole new chapter in the life of Davy Jones.

1970s
In his personal life, David had married Linda Haines in 1968, and by 1971 they were the parents of two daughters, Talia & Sarah. During the run of The Monkees, Jones had kept his hand in many business ventures. He bought a couple of race horses and had his former trainer, Basil Foster, train them. The Davy Jones Presents record company released a number of singles, and a hip clothing store called “Zilch” was opened in Greenwich Village. Jones also opened a New York City-style enclosed street market for artists & artisans called “The Street” in Los Angeles. David wasted no time returning to the small screen after The Monkees disbanded. He teamed up with musical director Doug Trevor on a one-hour ABC television special entitled Pop Goes Davy Jones. He also appeared in many popular TV shows during the 1970’s such as Laugh-In, Love, American Style, The New Scooby Doo Movies and Walt Disney’s Wonderful World of Color. His most memorable television appearance during this time was on an episode of The Brady Bunch where he sang his single, “Girl”. Jones signed with Bell Records in 1971 and released one album, entitled Davy Jones, along with several singles including “Girl” (the theme song for the Sandy Duncan film, Star Spangled Girl). Throughout the 1970’s, David released solo singles as well for MGM and Warner Brothers. His love for the theatre was never far from his heart, and in 1973 David travelled back to England for a six-month engagement in the Peter Nicholl’s play, Forget-Me-Not-Lane. Later that year he reprieved his role as The Artful Dodger alongside Ron Moody in a production of Oliver! that opened at the Music Center in Los Angeles. In 1975 David teamed up with Micky Dolenz and The Monkees’ song-writing duo, Tommy Boyce &Bobby Hart to form Dolenz, Jones, Boyce & Hart.

The group performed to enthusiastic audiences all over North America, Japan, Singapore & Thailand. They released an album, a couple of singles, appeared on numerous television shows and starred in their own TV special. In 1976, Dolenz & Jones recorded a Christmas single with Peter Tork, entitled “Christmas Is My Time of Year”, produced by Chip Douglas. After DJB&H parted ways, Micky and David continued performing together, acted in a stage production of Tom Sawyer, and eventually moved to England to star in Harry Nilsson’s play, The Point. At the end of the decade, Jones formed his own band, Toast, and toured the U.S., Ireland & England. He also appeared on a couple of episodes of the British television series, Horse in the House and decided to stay in England.

1980s
The 1980’s started with a bang as Jones played sold out concerts in Japan to a whole new generation of Monkee fans. He also met and married his second wife, Anita Pollinger and they had two daughters, Jessica & Annabel. David finally got his jockey’s license, and on September 19, 1980, rode his first race aboard Speed of Light at Newberry Race Track. He continued to be a regular on the charity sports circuit and was proud to have completed the London Marathon in three hours, forty minutes! There were starring roles in many “pantos” such as Cinderella, Dick Whittington & Puss in Boots, and appearances on television shows such as the popular B.B.C. children’s game show, Puzzle Trail. David’s theatre work included The Boyfriend and the role of Jesus in the West End production of Godspell. At the start of 1986, David & Peter Tork toured Australia in a show called The Sound of The Monkees. Micky Dolenz wasn’t able to join them due to prior commitments, but did agree to a summer tour of the United States. Between the two tours a funny thing happened – the MTV Monkees Marathon! Another wave of Monkeemania took off and the summer tour that was originally set to last 6 weeks turned into a three year affair that travelled around the world. Davy Jones was once again a hot teen idol and The Monkees were seen on nearly every television show imaginable. They released a new Monkees album, Pool It, along with 4 singles. David was involved in projects outside of The Monkees during this decade, such as writing his autobiography, They Made a Monkee Out of Me, and releasing solo singles in Japan, Britain & Australia. While on tour with The Monkees, David recorded a solo album entitled, Incredible. Although at the time it was overshadowed by the immense success of the Monkees, this album has since been re-released and dubbed one of the great lost albums of the 1980’s. Jones made countless personal appearances in conjunction with the promotion of his book and appeared in two episodes of the hit television show, My Two Dads. The decade ended with The Monkees being awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and David starring in another production of Oliver!, only this time he played the part of Fagin. His children felt it was about time he started acting his age!

1990s
David’s calendar remained full during the 1990’s as he was in high demand for television appearances such as on the B.B.C. show Trainer, ABC Afterschool Special, Florence Henderson’s Country Kitchen, Nashville Now, Herman’s Head, The Single Guy & Sabrina, the Teenage Witch. He landed the role of Vince Fontaine in a stage production of Grease that co-starred Sally Struthers. David also reprised his role on The Brady Bunch in a stage version of the show. He co-wrote the award-winning book, Mutant Monkees Meet the Masters of the Multi-Media Manipulation Machine!, that featured the work of progressive computer graphic artists. In 1994 Jones once again toured with Dolenz for over a year. 1995 was a huge year that saw David & Micky reunite with Peter Tork in an episode of the television show, Boy Meets World, as well as in The Brady Bunch Movie and in a Pizza Hut commercial with Ringo Starr. Michael Nesmith joined his fellow Monkees for a presentation of their platinum and multi-platinum album awards at The Hard Rock Café in Los Angeles. Soon plans for a Monkees 30th reunion were underway. In the next couple of years, there would be a documentary on the band produced by Disney, a television special produced by Nesmith that spoofed the original show, a new Monkees’ album entitled Justus that was completely written, played, sung & produced by the four members. An exclusive record release concert in Hollywood and subsequent tour of Britain was the first to include all four members since 1968. The North American leg of the tour didn’t include Nesmith, but that didn’t slow down the newest wave of Monkeemania. David continued to record on his own and released a Christmas album, solo album and a four-volume CD compilation of demos, outtakes and other rare material from throughout his career, entitled Just for the Record. In 1998 he joined Peter Noone & Bobby Sherman for The Teen Idols Tour. Jones won the Speedway Children’s Charities Celebrity Classic Golf Tournament in 1999. Even with all these achievements, David always claimed that his proudest moment happened on February 1, 1996. It was on that day, at age 50, that David won his first horse race aboard Digpast, a horse owned by his daughter, Sarah. The one-mile Ontario Amateur Riders Handicap took place at Lingfield in Surrey.

2000s
The new century saw David as busy as ever. He appeared on television shows such as 48 Hours, Hey Arnold, Meet the Royals, Living in TV Land and SpongeBob SquarePants. He had a cameo in Goldberg – P.I., sang the theme song for Sexina and was interviewed for countless television and radio programs as well as printed publications. He updated his autobiography and re-titled it Daydream Believin’. In 2001 David, Micky & Peter reunited for The Monkees’ 35th anniversary tour. The Monkeemania tour continued the following year without Peter. David was also busy recording his own music and released the album, Just Me in 2001. He also released a live album, a millennium mix version of “Daydream Believer”, a string of singles and his final album, a collection of standards, entitled She. The Davy Jones Band had a full roster of shows during this time, including the yearly Flower Power Concert Series during Epcot’s Flower and Garden Festival. In 2006 he recorded the single “Your Personal Penguin” which has since become a classic kid’s favorite. Written by children’s author & artist, Sandra Boynton, the song was a companion piece for a book of the same title. In 2008, Jones was named the number one teen idol of all time by Yahoo Music. David continued to act in “pantos”, taught motivational seminars, made a vast number of personal appearances and starred in a number of television commercials. He began training horses and had stables in Beavertown, Pennsylvania and Indiantown, Florida. Jones, the self-dubbed Manchester Cowboy, served as the commercial spokesman for Colonial Downs racetrack in Virginia. Personally, David welcomed three grandchildren into his life, Harrison “Harry” & Lauren “Lolo” McFadden and Phoenix Burrows. In 2009 he married again. 2011 marked The Monkees’ 45th anniversary and this brought David, Micky & Peter back together for another tour that boasted the best critical reviews of their career up to that point! Continued syndication of the show, DVD releases of the episodes and online viewing from sites such as YouTube created yet another new generation of fans. David was a loving father & grandfather who never stopped working, dreaming, and always remained accessible to his fans. He passed away on February 29, 2012 after doing what he loved best – being aboard his favorite riding horse, Zar and surrounded by his beloved herd. Stories of the incredible generosity David Jones showed throughout his life paint a vivid picture of the man beyond the celebrity. The Manchester Cowboy touched many lives, brought immense joy to millions and created a legacy that will live forever – Ride On!

TV APPEARANCES

1960s

  • BBC Sunday-Night Play: June Evening –Benny (1 episode, 1960)
  • Coronation Street – Colin Lomax (1 episode, 1961)
  • Z-Cars – Willie Thatcher/Frankie Sale (3 episodes, 1962)
  • Merv Griffin’s Talent Scouts – himself (1 episode, 1963)
  • The Ed Sullivan Show – The Artful Dodger (1 episode, 1964)
  • Thank Your Lucky Stars – himself (1 episode, 1965)
  • Shindig! – himself (1 episode, 1965)
  • Where the Action Is – himself (1 episode, 1965)
  • Ben Casey – Gregg Carter (1 episode, 1965)
  • The Farmer’s Daughter – Roland (1 episode, 1966)
  • American Bandstand – himself (2 episodes, 1966 & 1976)
  • Today – himself (4 episodes, 1966, 1986, 1996 & 1997)
  • The Monkees – Davy Jones (58 episodes, 1966-68)
  • The Rolf Harris Show – himself (1 episode, 1967)
  • Miss Teen International Pageant – himself (1967)
  • Dee Tine – himself (2 episodes, 1967 & 1968)
  • 10th Annual GRAMMY Awards – himself, presenter (1968)
  • Top of the Pops – himself (1 episode, 1968)
  • Hy Lit Show – himself (1 episode, 1968)
  • The Monkees Live at Budokan Hall-Japanese TV Special – himself (1968)
  • The Joey Bishop Show – himself (2 episodes, 1968 & 1969)
  • 33 1/3 Revolutions Per Monkee-TV Special – Davy Jones (1969)
  • Dick Clark’s Music Bag – himself (1969)
  • Happening ’69 – himself (1 episode, 1969)
  • Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In – himself (6 episodes, 1969)
  • The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson – himself (1 episode, 1969)
  • The Hollywood Squares – himself (5 episodes, 1969)
  • The Glen Campbell Goodtime Hour – himself (1 episode, 1969)
  • The Johnny Cash Show – himself (1 episode, 1969)
  • This Is Tom Jones-TV Special – himself (1969)
  • The Andy Williams Show – himself (1 episode, 1969)
  • The Peapicker In Piccadilly-Tennessee Ernie Ford TV Special – himself (1969)
  • Music Scene – himself (1 episode, 1969)

1970s

  • Get It Together – himself (1 episode, 1970)
  • Make Room for Granddaddy – himself (1 episode, 1970)
  • GTK “Get To Know”-Australian TV – himself (1 episode, 1970)
  • Love, American Style – Ronald/Ray (2 episodes, 1970 / 1973)
  • The Brady Bunch – himself (1 episode, 1971)
  • The Roger Whittaker Show – himself (1 episode, 1971)
  • In Session – himself (1 episode, 1971)
  • Pop Goes Davy Jones-TV Special – himself (1972)
  • The New Scooby-Doo Movies – [voice] himself (1 episode, 1972)
  • Treasure Island – [voice] Jim Hawkins (1973)
  • Oliver Twist – [voice] The Artful Dodger (1974)
  • American Bandstand – himself (1 episode, 1976)
  • The Mike Douglas Show – himself (1 episode, 1976)
  • Dinah! – himself (1 episode, 1976)
  • Don Kirshners Rock Concert – himself (1 episode, 1976)
  • The Great Golden Hits of The Monkees-TV Special – himself (1977)
  • Walt Disney’s Wonderful World of Color: The Bluegrass Special – Davey Sanders (1977)
  • The Tomorrow Show himself (1 episode, 1977)
  • Our Show – himself (1 episode, 1977)
  • Hot City himself (1 episode, 1978)
  • Tiswas – himself (1 episode, 1978)
  • Horse in the House – Frank Tyson (2 episodes, 1979)

1980s

  • Here Comes Davy Jones-Japanese TV Special – himself (1981)
  • Hello Davy-Japanese TV Special – himself (1981)
  • Tokyo Music Festival – himself (1982)
  • Where Are They Now? – himself (1 episode, 1982)
  • The Time of Your Life – himself (1 episode, 1983)
  • The Little and Large Show – himself (1 episode, 1984)
  • Pebble Mill at One – himself (1 episode, 1984)
  • Pop Quiz – himself (1 episode, 1984)
  • Blue Peter – himself (1 episode, 1984)
  • Saturday Superstore – himself (1 episode, 1984)
  • Puzzle Trail – himself & many characters (10 episodes, 1984)
  • The Uncle Floyd Show – himself (1 episode, 1984)
  • New Love, American Style - (1 episode, 1986)
  • Check It Out! – himself (1 episode, 1986)
  • MTV Video Music Awards – himself, presenter & performer (1986)
  • Walt Disney World’s 15th Birthday-TV Special – himself (1986)
  • Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade – himself (1986)
  • Good Morning Britain – himself (2 episodes, 1986 & 1989)
  • Good Morning America – himself (4 episodes, 1986, 1987, 1994 & 1996)
  • Entertainment Tonight – himself ( 4 episodes, 1986, 1995 & 2001)
  • Showbiz Today – himself (3 episodes, 1986, 1994 & 1996)
  • The 14th Annual American Music Awards – himself, presenter (1987)
  • The Morning Program – himself (1987)
  • Fan Club – himself (1 episode, 1987)
  • Young Talent Time-Australian TV – himself (1 episode, 1987)
  • Sally Jessy Raphael – himself (3 episodes, 1987, 1993 & 2002)
  • CBS This Morning – himself (2 episodes, 1988 & 1993)
  • Sledge Hammer – Jerry Vicuna (1 episode, 1988)
  • The Factory – himself (1 episode, 1988)
  • Saturday Morning Live – himself (1 episode, 1988)
  • Talk, Talk – himself (1 episode, 1988)
  • My Two Dads – Malcolm O’Dell (2 episodes, 1988 & 1989)
  • Midday-Australian TV – himself (2 episodes, 1988 & 1991)
  • Crook & Chase – himself (2 episodes, 1988 & 1989)
  • The Monkees Live-Dutch TV Special – himself (1989)
  • Don’t Just Sit There – himself (1 episode, 1989)
  • Aspel & Company – himself (1 episode, 1989)
  • A.M. Los Angeles – himself (1 episode, 1989)
  • People Are Talking – himself (1 episode, 1989)
  • The Pat Sajak Show – himself (1 episode, 1989)
  • My Generation – himself (1 episode, 1989)
  • Midday-Canadian TV – himself (1 episode, 1989)
  • Nashville Now – himself (2 episodes, 1989 &1991)

1990s

  • What’s Up, Dr. Ruth? – himself (1 episode, 1990)
  • This is Your Life-Harry Secombe – himself (1 episode, 1990)
  • Almost Live! – himself (1 episode, 1990)
  • The Don Kirshner Rock Awards – himself, presenter (1990)
  • The Oprah Winfrey Show – himself (2 episodes, 1990 & 1995)
  • ABC Afterschool Specials: It’s Only Rock & Roll – Albert Lynch (1 episode, 1991)
  • Country Kitchen – himself (1 episode, 1991)
  • Tonight Live with Steve Vizard – himself (1 episode, 1991)
  • The Howard Stern Show – himself (1 episode, 1991)
  • Trainer – Steve Moorcroft (1 episode, 1991)
  • Herman’s Head – himself (1 episode, 1992)
  • Live with Regis and Kathie Lee – himself (2 episodes, 1992 & 2001)
  • Bradymania: A Very Brady Special – himself (1993)
  • Boy Meets World – Reginald Fairfield (1 episode, 1995)
  • The Tonight Show with Jay Leno – himself (3 episodes, 1995, 1996 & 1998)
  • TV’s All Time Favorites-TV Special – himself (1995)
  • Lush Life – Johnny James (1 episode, 1996)
  • Prime Time Country – himself (1 episode, 1996)
  • Scoop – himself (1 episode, 1996)
  • Miss Teen USA Pageant – himself, performer (1996)
  • The Single Guy – himself (1 episode, 1996)
  • Group Sound Carnival-Japanese TV – himself (1 episode, 1996)
  • Hey, Hey We’re The Monkees-TV Special – himself (1997)
  • Hey, Hey It’s The Monkees-TV Movie – himself (1997, also producer credit)
  • Breakfast News – himself (1 episode, 1997)
  • The National Lottery – himself (1 episode, 1997)
  • Sabrina, the Teenage Witch – himself (1 episode, 1997)
  • Noel’s House Party – himself (1 episode, 1997)
  • The Big Breakfast – himself ( 1 episode, 1997)
  • Access Hollywood – himself (1 episode, 1997)
  • Hitz – himself (1 episode, 1997)
  • The Billboard Music Awards – himself, presenter (1997)
  • NBC Morning Show – himself (1 episode, 1997)
  • This Morning – himself (2 episodes, 1997 & 2002)
  • Biography – himself (2 episodes, 1997 & 2012)
  • Billboard Music Awards – himself, presenter (1998)
  • E! True Hollywood Story – himself (2 episodes, 1999)
  • Donny & Marie – himself (1 episode, 1999)
  • Ohayo Studios-Japanese TV – himself (1999)

2000s

  • The Roseanne Show – himself (1 episode, 2000)
  • Fox News Live – himself (1 episode, 2000)
  • Fox and Friends – himself (1 episode, 2000)
  • Behind the Music – himself (1 episode, 2000)
  • The Early Show – himself (1 episode, 2001)
  • Life After the Street-TV Special – himself (2001)
  • Tonight Show – himself (1 episode, 2001)
  • The Ed Bernstein Show – himself (1 episode, 2002)
  • Open House with Gloria Hunniford – himself (1 episode, 2002)
  • The 1st 13th Annual Fancy Anvil Award Show Program Special…Live!…In Stereo – himself (2002)
  • Hey Arnold! – [voice] himself (1 episode, 2002)
  • 48 Hours – himself (1 episode, 2002)
  • Weakest Link: NBC All-Star Edition – himself (1 episode, 2002)
  • TV Land Awards: A Celebration of Classic TV – himself, presenter (2003)
  • Meet the Royals – himself, host (17 episodes, 2003)
  • The J-K Conspiracy-TV Special – himself (2004)
  • VH1: A Very Classic Thanksgiving – himself (2004)
  • The Kids from Coronation Street-TV Special – himself (2004)
  • The Tony Danza Show – himself (1 episode, 2005)
  • Living in TV Land – himself ( 1 episode, 2006)
  • Extreme MakeOver Home Edition – himself ( 1 episode, 2006)
  • Making The Monkees-TV Special – himself (2007)
  • TV Land Confidencial – himself (2 episodes, 2007)
  • Girls Night Out – himself (1 episode, 2007)
  • Sex, Drugs and Rock ‘n’ Roll: The 60’s Revealed-TV Special – himself (2008)
  • SpongeBob SquarePants – himself (1 episode, 2009)
  • Stars on the Street-TV Special – himself (2009)

2010s

  • The Best Hit USA – himself (1 episode, 2010)
  • Loose Women – himself (1 episode, 2011)
  • Dr. Phil – himself (1 episode, 2011)
  • The Dreamsters – himself (14 episodes, 2011)
  • Phineas and Ferb – [voice] Nigel (1 episode, 2011)
  • My Music: 60’s Pop, Rock & Soul-TV Special – himself (2011)

FILM APPEARANCES

  • Head – himself (1968, also writing credit)
  • Lollipops, Roses and Talangka – himself (1971)
  • Star Spangled Girl – theme song (1971)
  • Heart and Soul-Documentary Short – himself (1988)
  • The Brady Bunch Movie – himself (1995)
  • A Very Brady Sequel – himself (1996)
  • Justus-Video – himself (1997)
  • The Monkees Live Summer Tour-Video – himself (2002)
  • Mayor of the Sunset Strip-Documentary – himself (2003)
  • The Third Wish – song “Daydream Believer” (2005)
  • Sexina – theme song (2007)
  • PROFILES Featuring Davy Jones-Video – himself (2008)
  • Mary Marie – special thanks (2010)
  • Straw Dogs – song “Goin’ Down” (2011)
  • Goldberg – P.I. – himself (2011)

DISCOGRAPHY

  • David Jones – (1965, Colpix)

o   “Dream Girl”/”Take Me to Paradise” – single (1965)

o   “What Are We Going to Do?”/”This Bouquet” – single (1965)

o   “The Girl from Chelsea”/”Theme for a New Love” – single (1965)

  • The Monkees – The Monkees (1966, Colgems)

o   “Last Train to Clarksville”/”Take a Giant Step” – single (1966)

  • More of The Monkees – The Monkees (1966, Colgems)

o   “I’m a Believer”/”(I’m Not Your) Steppin’ Stone” – single (1966)

  • “A Little Bit Me, A Little Bit You ”/”The Girl I Knew Somewhere” – single, The Monkees (1966, Colgems)
  • Headquarters – The Monkees (1967, Colgems)
  • Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn & Jones Ltd. – The Monkees (1967, Colgems)

o   “Pleasant Valley Sunday”/”Words” – single (1967)

  • The Birds, The Bees & The Monkees – The Monkees (1968, Colgems)

o   “Daydream Believer”/”Goin’ Down” – single (1967)

o   “Valleri”/”Tapioca Tundra” – single (1967)

o   “D.W. Washburn”/”It’s Nice To Be With You” – single (1967)

  • Davy – Japanese flexi disc interview single (1968, Raybert)
  • Head – The Monkees (1968, Colgems)

o   ”Porpoise Song”/”As We Go Along” – single (1968)

  • “In The Still Of The Night” – Jan & Dean single (1968, Jones added vocals)
  • Instant Replay – The Monkees (1969, Colgems)

o   “Teardrop City”/”A Man Without A Dream – single (1969)

o   “Listen To The Band”/”Someday Man” – single (1969)

  • The Monkees Present – The Monkees (1969, Colgems)

o   “Good Clean Fun”/”Mommy and Daddy” – single (1969)

  • Changes – The Monkees (1970, Colgems)

o   “Oh My My”/”I Love You Better” – single (1970)

  • “Do It in the Name of Love”/”Lady Jane” – single, Davy Jones & Micky Dolenz (1971, Bell)
  • Davy Jones – (1971, Bell)

o   “Rainy Jane” / “Welcome to My Love” – single (1971)

o   “I Really Love You” / “Sittin’ in the Apple Tree” – single (1971)

o   “Girl”/”Take My Love” – single (1971)

o   “I’ll Believe in You”/”Road to Love” – single (1972)

  • “Who Was It?”/”You’re a Lady” – single (1972, MGM)
  • “You’re a Lady” – special single (1972, sung in Japanese)
  • “Rubberene” – promo single (1973, MGM)
  • Dolenz, Jones, Boyce & Hart – (1976, Capitol)

o   “I Remember The Feeling”/”Teenager In Love” – single (1976)

o   “Savin’ My Love For You”/“I Love You (And I’m Glad That I Said It)” – single (1976)

  • “Christmas Is My Time Of Year”/”White Christmas” – single, Davy Jones, Micky Dolenz & Peter Tork (1976, fan club release)
  • “The Point”– soundtrack (1978, MGM)

o   “Life Line”/”It’s A Jungle Out There”/”Gotta Get Up” –EP (1978)

  • “(Hey Ra Ra Ra) Happy Birthday Mickey Mouse”/”You Don’t Have to Be a Country Boy to Sing a Country Song” – single (1978, Warner Brothers)
  • Davy Jones Live – (1981, JAL)

o   “It’s Now”/”How Do You Know” – single (1981)

o   “Dance Gypsy”/”Can She Do It (Like She Dances)” – single (1981)

  • Dolenz, Jones, Boyce & Hart Live in Japan – (1981, Capitol-Toshiba EMI)
  • “Sixteen (Baby, You’ll Soon Be Sixteen)”/”Baby Holdout” – single (1982, Pioneer)
  • “Rainbows”/”Steam Engine” – single (1982, Monkees Relived)
  • “I’ll Love You Forever”/”When I Look Back On Christmas” – single (1984, JJ)
  • “Judy Get Down” – JAKKO single (1986, Jones added vocals)
  • “That Was Then, This Is Now”/”(Theme From) The Monkees” – single (1986, Arista)
  • “Daydream Believer”(remix) /”Randy Scouse Git” – single (1986, Arista)
  • Pool It! – The Monkees (1987, Rhino)

o   “Heart and Soul”/”MGBGT” – single (1987)

o   “Every Step of the Way”/”(I’ll) Love You Forever” – single (1987)

  • Live 1967 – The Monkees (1987, Rhino)
  • 20th Anniversary Tour 1986 – The Monkees (1987, Rhino)
  • Missing Links – The Monkees (1987, Rhino)
  • “After Your Heart”/”Hippy Hippy Shake” – single (1987, Powderworks)
  • Incredible – (1988, Dome)
  • Davy Jones Sings The Monkees & More – (1988, Dome)
  • “Manchester Boy” – single (1988, promo released with Book on Tape version of They Made a Monkee Out of Me)
  • Missing Links Volume Two – The Monkees (1990, Rhino)
  • “The Greatest Story Ever Told” – single (1992, promo released with book, Mutant Monkees Meet the Masters of the Multi-Media Manipulation Machine!)
  • It’s Christmas Time Again – (1992)
  • Live! – The Monkees (1994, sold only at shows)
  • Missing Links Volume Three – The Monkees (1996, Rhino)
  • Justus – The Monkees (1996, Rhino)
  • “I Can Make You Happy” –1972 song on compilation CD (1998, Rhino)
  • Teen Idols 1998 Tour – (1998, sold only at shows)
  • Don’t Go – (1998, Hercules)
  • Just for the Record – four-volume series (1999, Hercules)
  • Just Me – (2001, Fire Inside)
  • “Exotic Animals & Beaches of Pennsylvania” – Johnny J. Blair song (2001, Jones narration)
  • The Monkees Summer 1967: The Complete U.S. Concert Recordings – The Monkees (2001, Rhino)
  • 2001: Live In Las Vegas – The Monkees (2001, sold only at shows)
  • “Daydream Believer” (millennium dance version) – single, download (2001, Paradise MusicWerks)
  • Monkeemania 2002-Live in Toronto – Davy Jones & Micky Dolenz (2002, sold only at shows)
  • The Monkees Live Summer Tour – The Monkees (2003, Win Media)
  • Extended Versions – The Monkees (2003, BMG)
  • Just Me 2 – (2004, Fire Inside)
  • Davy Jones Live!!! – (2004, Hercules)
  • Daydream Believin’ – (2004, Hercules)
  • Christmas Jones – (2005, Fire Inside)
  • Studio Versions of Monkees Songs – download (2006, Paradise MusicWerks)
  • “Your Personal Penguin”– single (2006, companion to Sandra Boynton children’s book of the same title)
  • Incredible Revisited – (2008, Fire Inside)
  • “It’s Christmas” – special single (2008, Formative)
  • Biltown Bus Stop Radio Hour – download (2009, Fire Inside)
  • She – (2009, Fire Inside)

o   “Amore”– single (2010)

  • Unplugged In The Morning-Radio Broadcast 1998 – download (2011, Fire Inside)
  • Wild Ponies Lost & Found – three volume series download (2011, Fire Inside)
  • Live in Tokyo 1999 – download (2011, Fire Inside)
  • Let Them Be Little – EP (2012, Fire Inside)

 THEATRE CREDITS

  • Peter Pan – Little Michael (1962, Starring Jane Asher, UK)
  • Oliver! – The Artful Dodger (1962-65, Original West End & Broadway productions starring Ron Moody, Georgia Brown & Clive Revill)
  • Pickwick – Sam Weller (1965, Original David Merrick production starring Harry Secombe, USA)
  • Forget-Me-Not-Lane – Young Frank (1972-1973, Peter Nichols’ play co-starring Wendy Padbury, UK)
  • Oliver! – The Artful Dodger (1973, Co-starring Ron Moody, USA)
  • Tom Sawyer – Tom Sawyer (1977, Co-starring Micky Dolenz, Sacramento, CA )
  • The Point – Oblio (1977, Harry Nilsson play co-starring Micky Dolenz, Mermaid Theatre, UK)
  • Jack and the Beanstalk – Jack Liverpudlian (1978-1979, The Empire Theatre, Liverpool, UK panto)
  • Puss In Boots – Colin (1980-1981, Swansea, South Wales panto)
  • Dick Whittington – Dick Whittington (1983-1984, Southend-on-Sea, UK panto)
  • Cinderella – Buttons (1984-1985, Camberley, UK panto)
  • Godspell – Jesus (1985-1986, Fortune Theatre, UK)
  • Oliver! – Fagan (1988-1990, Starlight Theatre, Hirschfield Theatre & Fifth Avenue Musical Theatre, USA)
  • Brady Bunch On Stage – Davy Jones (1992-1994, Village Gate Theatre & Westwood Playhouse, USA)
  • Rock and Roll Pom Pom Show – (1994, Atlantic City, NJ)
  • Grease – Vince Fontaine (1994, co-starring Sally Struthers, USA)
  • Cinderella – Buttons (2006, Florida, USA panto)
  • Aladdin– Aladdin (2007, Florida, USA panto)

LITERARY CREDITS

  • They Made a Monkee Out of Me (1986, audio book released 1988)
  • Mutant Monkees Meet the Masters of the Multi-Media Manipulation Machine! (1992, co-author)
  • Daydream Believin’ (2000)

RADIO CREDITS

  • There is a Happy Land – Jackie Heseltine (1960, B.B.C. radio play)

VIDEO GAME CREDITS

  • Hey, Hey We’re The Monkees – himself (1996)
  • TV Land Presents Blast from the Past – himself (2001)

AWARDS & NOMINATIONS

  • [Nominated] Tony Award – (1963, Best Performance by a Featured Actor in a Musical – Oliver! As The Artful Dodger)
  • [Won] Emmy Award – (1967, Outstanding Comedy Series – The Monkees)
  • [Won] Emmy Award – (1967, Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Comedy – The Monkees, “Royal Flush”)
  • [Nominated] Emmy Award – (1968, Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Comedy – The Monkees, “The Devil And Peter Tork”)
  • [Won] Rated K: For Kids, By Kids – (1986, Favorite Music Group – The Monkees)
  • [Won] MTV Friday Night Video Fights – (1987, The Monkees- Last music artist to win)
  • [Won] Nickelodeon Year-End Poll – (1987, The Cutest Guy of 1987)
  • [Won] TV Land Award – (2003, Favorite Guest Performance by a Musician on a TV Show – The Brady Bunch)
  • [Won] TV Land Award – (2004, Favorite Sing-Along Theme Song – The Monkees)
  • [Won] Yahoo Music – (2008, Number One Teen Idol of All Time)